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Title: Overcoming the Data Crisis in Biodiversity Conservation
Authors: Kindsvater, Holly K.; Dulvy, Nicholas K.; Horswill, Cat and Juan-Jorda, Maria-Jose; Mangel, Marc; Matthiopoulos, Jason
Citation: TRENDS IN ECOLOGY \& EVOLUTION, 2018, 33, 676-688
Abstract: How can we track population trends when monitoring data are sparse? Population declines can go undetected, despite ongoing threats. For example, only one of every 200 harvested species are monitored. This gapleads to uncertaintyabout the seriousness of declines and hampers effective conservation. Collecting more data is important, but we can also make better use of existing information. Prior knowledge of physiology, life history, and community ecology can be used to inform population models. Additionally, in multispecies models, information can be shared among taxa based on phylogenetic, spatial, or temporal proximity. By exploiting generalities across species that share evolutionary or ecological characteristics within Bayesian hierarchical models, we can fill crucial gaps in the assessment of species' status with unparalleled quantitative rigor.
Keywords: SIZE SPECTRUM; DYNAMICS; PREDATION; HISTORY; MODELS; LIFE; METAANALYSIS; UNCERTAINTY; PREDICTIONS; EXTINCTION
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE LONDON
Type: Review
Language: English
DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2018.06.004
URI: http://dspace.azti.es/handle/24689/791
ISSN: 0169-5347
E-ISSN: 1872-8383
Funder: US National Science Foundation [DEB-1556779, DEB-1555729]
Natural Environment Research Council [NE/P004180/1]
Marine Alliance for Science and Technology Scotland [SG411]
Appears in Publication types:Artículos científicos



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